clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

What Most Annoyed Local Dining Pros in 2017?

“Let go of the likes and concentrate on the flavors!”

A plate of tuna poke.
Photo by Claudia Totir / Getty Images

As per tradition, Eater asked a group of restaurant critics, journalists, bloggers, and friends of the site to weigh in on the year in food. Here are their biggest gripes.

Rina Rapuano, Zagat DC/freelance food writer: “Restaurateurs taking a trend and beating it into the ground, like poke and tiki bars. Know when enough is enough.”

Don Rockwell, DC Dining: “Name your poison: the continued glorification of junk food, or the rapidly escalating fees for restaurant delivery.”

Jessica Sidman, Washingtonian food editor: “Can I please get my own drink menu? Sick of sharing a one-page cocktail list with four people.”

Tim Carman, Washington Post food writer: “All the poke. If I wanted good fish with rice, I’d just go to a damn sushi house.”

Stefanie Gans, Northern Virginia Magazine restaurant critic and dining editor: “Stop asking what kind of water I want. Just pour me some tap and if I want something else I’ll tell you.”

Nevin Martell, DC Modern Luxury dining editor: “Chefs have started to design dishes just for Instagram. But just because they look beautiful doesn't necessarily mean they taste good,which – and I can't believe I have to say this – should be the primary goal. Let go of the likes and concentrate on the flavors!”

Laura Hayes, Washington City Paper food editor: “A lukewarm ramen cocktail containing Scotch at Nocturne.”

Tom Sietsema, Washington Post restaurant critic: “So many contenders: dim restaurant lighting, epic menu introductions, the cost of parking at the Wharf.”

Lori Gardner, Been There, Eaten That: “Can you hear me now? NO!”

David Hagedorn, Arlington Magazine/Bethesda Magazine dining columnist: “The parking situation at the Wharf, $25 and up.”

Sugar Shack - Shaw

1932 9th Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20001 (202) 629-1417 Visit Website

Sign up for the newsletter Sign up for the Eater DC newsletter

The freshest news from the local food world