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Global Communal Grill Gyu-Kaku Makes Its Local Debut In Arlington

Diners can sip on Japanese beers and crowd around an open flame starting Wednesday, July 25

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Gyu-Kaku opens to the public on Wednesday, July 25 in Arlington.
Gyu-Kaku/official photo

Japanese barbecue grill Gyu-Kaku is opening the first of many area locations on Wednesday, July 25, exposing DIY diners to table-cooked meats and seafood in a sleek and industrial setting.

The new 130-seat restaurant, wedged next to the Clarendon Metro stop (1119 N. Hudson Street, Arlington, Va.), is rolling out dinner service at 5 p.m. with a limited menu for the rest of the week. Its full-blown lineup of grilled options and appetizers will be released in three weeks.

“We’re taking our time with this as we want to do it right,” says partner David Chung, claiming “phones are ringing off the hook.”

Initial hours of operation are Tuesday to Saturday, with the last reservations taken at 8:30 p.m. Friends and family got a first taste over the weekend and recorded Yelp reviews for featured meaty offerings like beef tongue, skirt steak, and pork belly, as well as mango Mai Tai cocktails made behind the bar. The opening menu also includes vegetable-friendly fare like fried rice bibimbap and ramen, along with layered green tea cakes from international confectioner Lady M. Prix-fixe packaged orders run $60 (for two) to $180 (for six).

Chung and his team, who control the expansion rights for Virginia, D.C., and Maryland, recently parted ways with Georgetown’s 10-year-old Chinese Disco to focus on blanketing the area with “several” Gyu-Kaku grills over the next few years. Stateside, most are clumped across California and the closest to D.C. sit in Manhattan.

Status: Projected to open at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 25; 1119 N. Hudson Street, Arlington, Va.; website.

Scroll on for a look inside:

A seven-seat bar is stocked with lots of sake and Kirin Ichiban on draft.
Gyu-Kaku/official photo
Funky cow-themed art and modern lighting surrounds diners at Gyu-Kaku.
Gyu-Kaku/official photo
Orchids and lots of light wood paneling accent Gyu-Kaku’s 3,500-square-foot space.
Gyu-Kaku/official photo

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