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Small Batch Brewery From Pennsylvania Sets Up Weekend Beer Garden in Shaw

Voodoo Brewery is exploring its options in the D.C. market

Voodoo Brewery’s temporary beer garden at 625 T Street NW
Voodoo Brewery/Facebook

For the past two weekends, Voodoo Brewery has been pouring small batch beers from its Pennsylvania production facilities out of a shipping container bar in an empty lot across the street from the Howard Theater in Shaw.

Matteo Rachocki, CEO of the employee-owned brewery based out of Meadville, Pennsylvania, tells Eater that will continue this Friday (5 p.m. to 10 p.m.) and Saturday (noon to 10 p.m.) at 625 T Street NW. Voodoo plans to continue its weekend operation and and could later expand to six days per week, pending permits. That means competition for the Right Proper brewpub nearby isn’t expected to let up anytime soon.

Rachocki says brewer-friendly licensing attracted the company to D.C. Since 2005, Voodoo has grown to seven brick-and-mortar locations and two breweries that produce about 6,000 barrels of beer a year. Voodoo first experimented with its shipping container incubator last year in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, which led it to open a pub there in the fall.

The brewery specializes in imperial-style ales and lagers, which means the alcohol percentage is typically high. Voodoo uses a proprietary yeast and sources hops form the Pacific Northwest.

At its temporary spot in Shaw, the company has been rotating eight different tap lines. Rachocki says the Bohemian style pilsner has been a big seller, and so has a Good Vibes IPA. The temporary beer garden could soon up its lineup to 10 beers, Rachocki says. All of them are served in compostable corn-based cups.

In addition to beer, Voodoo has brought in a local DJ to play music and has partnered with DCity Smokehouse to provide food.

Although it will be closed this Sunday due to a private event at the space, Rochocki expects Voodoo to keep pouring on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday for the foreseeable future.

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