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The Imperial tower ($144) comes with 18 oysters, eight clams, six shrimp, smoked mussels, oysters rockefeller, whole lobster. and blue crab “Imperial”
The Imperial’s grand seafood tower
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

22 Places to Eat and Drink in Adams Morgan

The bar-heavy neighborhood is known for some of the city’s most creative cooking

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The Imperial’s grand seafood tower
| Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Once known as a bar-hopping zone, Adams Morgan has seriously stepped up its game in recent years. This is a neighborhood where critically acclaimed spots like Tail Up Goat and sister restaurant Reveler’s Hour sit alongside standbys like Julia’s Empanadas, Lucky Buns, and Donburi. The blocks along 18th Street are destinations for everything from Mexican street food to Korean fried chicken or Middle Eastern-inspired cocktails, and newbies like Azerbaijani bakery Sharbat have joined the scene — even amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The past months have seen a big shakeup for trendy (and controversial) hotel the Line, with the closure of Spike Gjerde’s A Rake’s Progress and Erik Bruner-Yang’s Spoken English and Brothers and Sisters. Some things haven’t changed, however — this is still where late-night partiers can find gigantic pieces of pizza from Jumbo Slice.

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Federalist Pig (Multiple locations)

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1654 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 827-4400
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Pitmaster Rob Sonderman made it to Netflix fame after his restaurant was name-dropped in the sixth and final season of House of Cards. The Federalist Pig dish in question happened to be the pork ribs: other dishes include smoky goods like pork shoulder, sliced brisket, fried Brussels spouts, and stunt-y sandwiches. Federalist Pig is working on expanding into the vacant space next-door, and it runs a barbecue trailer in a Hyattsville, Maryland, parking lot attached to the construction site that will become its second location.

A barbecue platter from Federalist Pig
Federalist Pig excels at brisket, sausage, and ribs.
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

2. Super Tacos & Bakery

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1762 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 232-7121
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Super Tacos & Bakery is a neighborhood fixture for a reason: this no-frills street corner shop turns out hefty, tasty burritos with guacamole for $10 or less.

3. Reveler's Hour

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1775 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, DC 20009

The team at Mediterranean-minded Tail Up Goat branched out by opening a second restaurant, Reveler’s Hour, shortly before the pandemic hit. This (slightly) more casual spot is all about excellent wine, pasta, grilled entrees, and comforting fare like garlic knots or gelato.

Bucatini with anchovy and tomato from Reveler’s Hour
Bucatini with anchovy and tomato from Reveler’s Hour
Reveler’s Hour [official]

4. Mama Ayesha's

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1967 Calvert St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 232-5431
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As a pioneer of Middle Eastern cuisine in D.C., Mama Ayesha Abraham opened this restaurant in the 1960s. Since then, it has grown into a neighborhood favorite and an icon for its famous presidential mural that features leaders since Dwight D. Eisenhower — minus President Donald Trump— painted on its exterior wall.

Photo by Karim H. / Yelp

5. Tail Up Goat

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1827 Adams Mill Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 986-9600
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D.C. diners (and Michelin guide inspectors) love the Mediterranean flavors at this relaxed fine dining spot. Menu items change daily, but an order of toast is always a smart move. Recent inventive dishes include a slice of seaweed sourdough with foie gras-roasted foraged mushrooms and Carolina gold rice pudding for dessert.

Photo by Rey Lopez for Eater D.C.

6. No Goodbyes

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1770 Euclid St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 864-4180
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Chef Opie Crooks took charge at The Line, debuting hotel restaurant No Goodbyes in August with a thorough focus on flavors and products from the Chesapeake region. That means homemade potato chips dusted in the restaurant’s own crab spice or a bacon steak with pork from Virginia farms. There are also biscuit sandwiches and carrot cake oatmeal for breakfast.

A charcuterie “salthouse board” at No Goodbyes comes with black pepper biscuits, homemade pickles, and jam
A charcuterie “salthouse board” at No Goodbyes
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

7. Taqueria Al Lado

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1792 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 481-0048
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A lot of care goes into the tortillas at Taqueria Al Lado, where blue and white corn is sourced from Mexico and put through the process of boiling, drying, and grinding in-house. The restaurant devoted to Mexican street food opened in March 2021 from a chef and partner of trusty neighborhood spot Osteria al Volo next-door.

A large front window airs out the space at Taqueria al Lado
The open front window at Taqueria al Lado
Evan Caplan/For Eater D.C.

8. Sharbat

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2473 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 843-5252
Visit Website

At Azerbaijani bakery Sharbat, the sweets are labor-intensive: pakhlava involves 15 sheets of stacked, super-thin dough. There are cheese- and meat-filled snacks, but cakes are the most popular choice, with flavors including honey, apricot, and raspberry. Owner Ilhama Safarova opened the shop in 2020 to share the flavors of her homeland.

A slice of Sharbat’s honey cake shows of airy layers mixed with a light milk cream whipped on the stove.
Sharbat’s honey cake is a signature item.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

9. Mintwood Place

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1813 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 234-6732
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Classic French dishes meet American farm fare at this neighborhood restaurant that was started by Cedric Maupillier (Convivial) and now run by chef Harper McClure, a longtime D.C. presence at places like Le Diplomate, Brabo, and Vidalia. Go for rich dishes like French onion soup, chicken liver parfaits with espelette pepper jam, bacon cheeseburgers, and mussels Provencal.

10. Julia's Empanadas

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2452 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 328-6232
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One of D.C.’s most beloved spots for late-night snacks, Julia’s Empanadas began in Adams Morgan. Revelers enjoy coming here until 4 a.m. for empanadas stuffed with chorizo, or served Jamaican or Chilean style, or even filled with fruit.

11. Tryst

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2459 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 232-5500
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Tryst is known for its eclectic decor and easy-going vibe. Diners head here for coffee, cocktails, craft brews, and gourmet sandwiches. The coffeehouse opens every day with free Wi-Fi from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

The patio at Tryst.
The patio at Tryst.
Tryst

12. Donburi

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2438 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 629-1047
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Donburi’s Japanese rice bowls make this a popular spot for a quick meal. Options include salmon sashimi, barbecue eel, or panko-coated pork served on golden brown rice with Japanese pickles and garnishes.

A bowl of fried chicken
A karaage bowl from Donburi
Joseph Victor Stefanchik for The Washington Post via Getty Images

13. BUL

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2431 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 733-3921
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The sister restaurant to nearby ramen spot Sakuramen, BUL specializes in Korean food meant to soak up soju. Think extra-crunchy fried chicken, corn topped with melted mozzarella cheese, bulgogi tacos, and spicy squid rice.

14. Zenebech Restaurant

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2004, 2420 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 667-4700
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Decades-old Ethiopian restaurant Zenebech jumped neighborhoods in 2017 to land in Adams Morgan, serving up classics like kitfo (raw beef) and doro wot (chicken stew) and fresh injera.

15. Lapis Afghan Bistro

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1847 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 299-9630
Visit Website

Expect to feast on dumplings, sauteed pumpkin with garlic yogurt, baked eggplant, and standout kebabs at this charming Afghan restaurant serving home-style dishes and halal meats.

16. The Game Sports Pub

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2411 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 846-1952
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Longtime D.C. bartender Jo-Jo Valenzuela and business partner Oscar Guardado replaced Ventnor Sports Cafe with a Filipino-inflected sports bar that serves satisfying lumpia Shanghai, sizzling pork sisig, adobo chicken wings, funky sandwiches, and fried oreos. Tiki on 18th, the sister tropical bar upstairs, also sends frozen drinks out to the patio on the street.

A pork belly sandwich from the Game
A pork belly sandwich from the Game
The Game

17. Shibuya Eatery

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2321 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 450-2151
Visit Website

Chef Darren Norris, formerly of Kushi and Perry’s, rolled out a three-piece complex devoted to Japanese food and drinks through the course of the pandemic. At the bottom, Shibuya Eatery serves a takeout-friendly mix of sushi, sashimi, hot or cold noodle bowls, small plates, and grilled kushiyaki (skewers). There’s also Shabu Plus, a high-end option for hot pot and kaiseki-style dishes, and cocktail bar Death Punch on the top floor.

Dining Review - Shibuya
Sushi balls from Shibuya
Deb Lindsey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

18. The Green Zone

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2226 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(571) 201-5145
Visit Website

This 18th Street bar serves up cocktails based around the flavors of the Middle East. Frozen minty lemonade is a must-order, spiked or not. The “Janissary Corps,” made with Green Hat gin, lemon, and pistachio, is another standby. Beyond drinks, find falafel, spicy fries, and DJ nights promising “the hottest Arabic and Middle Eastern jams west of Beirut.”

The Green Zone

19. Yerevan Market and Cafe

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2204 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 516-5924
Visit Website

This Armenian cafe creates a new meeting place for expats and anyone else who wants to try gata, a semisweet, filled cake. Yerevan Market and Cafe opened in August from a couple who wanted to introduce coffee, pastries, savory salads, stuffed meatballs, and more dishes from Armenia’s capital, Yerevan, to Washingtonians.

Folded, meat-stuffed flatbread called lahmajun from Yerevan
Lahmajun from Yerevan
Yerevan

20. Jack Rose Dining Saloon

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2007 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 588-7388
Visit Website

Whiskey reigns supreme at this local favorite, which boasts a high-end dining area and open-air terrace. The menu skews Southern, offering dishes like jalapeno hushpuppies with Crystal hot sauce mayo, whiskey wings, pork chops with sorghum mustard, and bourbon pecan tarts. The open-air terrace on top is heated, and there's also a seasonal tiki bar upstairs.

People sit at the bar at Jack Rose Dining Saloon
Jack Rose’s bar boasts one of the most extensive whiskey collections in the country.
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

21. The Imperial

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2001 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 299-0334
Visit Website

Jack Rose Dining Saloon’s owners spared no expense with this sleek, multi-story sequel, which opened in 2019 with a focus on seafood and Southern-leaning dishes. Stop here for cocktails and oysters during happy hour, or a newly-added weekend brunch. Dram & Grain, the dark basement bar equipped with a fireplace, has more of a speakeasy vibe.

Barstools at the Imperial
Barstools at the Imperial
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

22. Lucky Buns

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2000 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 506-1713
Visit Website

Burgers are the raison d’être for Lucky Buns, where diners can top their patties with everything from hatch green chile to pickled beet relish or tonkatsu sauce. There are plenty of chicken sandwich options, too. Don’t skip an order of curry-flavored fries.

A double burger from Lucky Buns
A double burger from Lucky Buns
Lucky Buns [official]

1. Federalist Pig (Multiple locations)

1654 Columbia Rd NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
A barbecue platter from Federalist Pig
Federalist Pig excels at brisket, sausage, and ribs.
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

Pitmaster Rob Sonderman made it to Netflix fame after his restaurant was name-dropped in the sixth and final season of House of Cards. The Federalist Pig dish in question happened to be the pork ribs: other dishes include smoky goods like pork shoulder, sliced brisket, fried Brussels spouts, and stunt-y sandwiches. Federalist Pig is working on expanding into the vacant space next-door, and it runs a barbecue trailer in a Hyattsville, Maryland, parking lot attached to the construction site that will become its second location.

1654 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

2. Super Tacos & Bakery

1762 Columbia Rd NW, Washington, DC 20009

Super Tacos & Bakery is a neighborhood fixture for a reason: this no-frills street corner shop turns out hefty, tasty burritos with guacamole for $10 or less.

1762 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, DC 20009

3. Reveler's Hour

1775 Columbia Rd NW, Washington, DC 20009
Bucatini with anchovy and tomato from Reveler’s Hour
Bucatini with anchovy and tomato from Reveler’s Hour
Reveler’s Hour [official]

The team at Mediterranean-minded Tail Up Goat branched out by opening a second restaurant, Reveler’s Hour, shortly before the pandemic hit. This (slightly) more casual spot is all about excellent wine, pasta, grilled entrees, and comforting fare like garlic knots or gelato.

1775 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, DC 20009

4. Mama Ayesha's

1967 Calvert St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
Photo by Karim H. / Yelp

As a pioneer of Middle Eastern cuisine in D.C., Mama Ayesha Abraham opened this restaurant in the 1960s. Since then, it has grown into a neighborhood favorite and an icon for its famous presidential mural that features leaders since Dwight D. Eisenhower — minus President Donald Trump— painted on its exterior wall.

1967 Calvert St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

5. Tail Up Goat

1827 Adams Mill Rd NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
Photo by Rey Lopez for Eater D.C.

D.C. diners (and Michelin guide inspectors) love the Mediterranean flavors at this relaxed fine dining spot. Menu items change daily, but an order of toast is always a smart move. Recent inventive dishes include a slice of seaweed sourdough with foie gras-roasted foraged mushrooms and Carolina gold rice pudding for dessert.

1827 Adams Mill Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

6. No Goodbyes

1770 Euclid St NW, Washington, DC 20009
A charcuterie “salthouse board” at No Goodbyes comes with black pepper biscuits, homemade pickles, and jam
A charcuterie “salthouse board” at No Goodbyes
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Chef Opie Crooks took charge at The Line, debuting hotel restaurant No Goodbyes in August with a thorough focus on flavors and products from the Chesapeake region. That means homemade potato chips dusted in the restaurant’s own crab spice or a bacon steak with pork from Virginia farms. There are also biscuit sandwiches and carrot cake oatmeal for breakfast.

1770 Euclid St NW
Washington, DC 20009

7. Taqueria Al Lado

1792 Columbia Rd NW, Washington, DC 20009
A large front window airs out the space at Taqueria al Lado
The open front window at Taqueria al Lado
Evan Caplan/For Eater D.C.

A lot of care goes into the tortillas at Taqueria Al Lado, where blue and white corn is sourced from Mexico and put through the process of boiling, drying, and grinding in-house. The restaurant devoted to Mexican street food opened in March 2021 from a chef and partner of trusty neighborhood spot Osteria al Volo next-door.

1792 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, DC 20009

8. Sharbat

2473 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
A slice of Sharbat’s honey cake shows of airy layers mixed with a light milk cream whipped on the stove.
Sharbat’s honey cake is a signature item.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

At Azerbaijani bakery Sharbat, the sweets are labor-intensive: pakhlava involves 15 sheets of stacked, super-thin dough. There are cheese- and meat-filled snacks, but cakes are the most popular choice, with flavors including honey, apricot, and raspberry. Owner Ilhama Safarova opened the shop in 2020 to share the flavors of her homeland.

2473 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

9. Mintwood Place

1813 Columbia Rd NW, Washington, D.C. 20009

Classic French dishes meet American farm fare at this neighborhood restaurant that was started by Cedric Maupillier (Convivial) and now run by chef Harper McClure, a longtime D.C. presence at places like Le Diplomate, Brabo, and Vidalia. Go for rich dishes like French onion soup, chicken liver parfaits with espelette pepper jam, bacon cheeseburgers, and mussels Provencal.

1813 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

10. Julia's Empanadas

2452 18th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009

One of D.C.’s most beloved spots for late-night snacks, Julia’s Empanadas began in Adams Morgan. Revelers enjoy coming here until 4 a.m. for empanadas stuffed with chorizo, or served Jamaican or Chilean style, or even filled with fruit.

2452 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

11. Tryst

2459 18th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
The patio at Tryst.
The patio at Tryst.
Tryst

Tryst is known for its eclectic decor and easy-going vibe. Diners head here for coffee, cocktails, craft brews, and gourmet sandwiches. The coffeehouse opens every day with free Wi-Fi from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.

2459 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

12. Donburi

2438 18th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
A bowl of fried chicken
A karaage bowl from Donburi
Joseph Victor Stefanchik for The Washington Post via Getty Images

Donburi’s Japanese rice bowls make this a popular spot for a quick meal. Options include salmon sashimi, barbecue eel, or panko-coated pork served on golden brown rice with Japanese pickles and garnishes.

2438 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

13. BUL

2431 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009

The sister restaurant to nearby ramen spot Sakuramen, BUL specializes in Korean food meant to soak up soju. Think extra-crunchy fried chicken, corn topped with melted mozzarella cheese, bulgogi tacos, and spicy squid rice.

2431 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

14. Zenebech Restaurant

2004, 2420 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009

Decades-old Ethiopian restaurant Zenebech jumped neighborhoods in 2017 to land in Adams Morgan, serving up classics like kitfo (raw beef) and doro wot (chicken stew) and fresh injera.

2004, 2420 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

15. Lapis Afghan Bistro

1847 Columbia Rd NW, Washington, D.C. 20009

Expect to feast on dumplings, sauteed pumpkin with garlic yogurt, baked eggplant, and standout kebabs at this charming Afghan restaurant serving home-style dishes and halal meats.

1847 Columbia Rd NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

Related Maps

16. The Game Sports Pub

2411 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
A pork belly sandwich from the Game
A pork belly sandwich from the Game
The Game

Longtime D.C. bartender Jo-Jo Valenzuela and business partner Oscar Guardado replaced Ventnor Sports Cafe with a Filipino-inflected sports bar that serves satisfying lumpia Shanghai, sizzling pork sisig, adobo chicken wings, funky sandwiches, and fried oreos. Tiki on 18th, the sister tropical bar upstairs, also sends frozen drinks out to the patio on the street.

2411 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

17. Shibuya Eatery

2321 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
Dining Review - Shibuya
Sushi balls from Shibuya
Deb Lindsey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Chef Darren Norris, formerly of Kushi and Perry’s, rolled out a three-piece complex devoted to Japanese food and drinks through the course of the pandemic. At the bottom, Shibuya Eatery serves a takeout-friendly mix of sushi, sashimi, hot or cold noodle bowls, small plates, and grilled kushiyaki (skewers). There’s also Shabu Plus, a high-end option for hot pot and kaiseki-style dishes, and cocktail bar Death Punch on the top floor.

2321 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

18. The Green Zone

2226 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
The Green Zone

This 18th Street bar serves up cocktails based around the flavors of the Middle East. Frozen minty lemonade is a must-order, spiked or not. The “Janissary Corps,” made with Green Hat gin, lemon, and pistachio, is another standby. Beyond drinks, find falafel, spicy fries, and DJ nights promising “the hottest Arabic and Middle Eastern jams west of Beirut.”

2226 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

19. Yerevan Market and Cafe

2204 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
Folded, meat-stuffed flatbread called lahmajun from Yerevan
Lahmajun from Yerevan
Yerevan

This Armenian cafe creates a new meeting place for expats and anyone else who wants to try gata, a semisweet, filled cake. Yerevan Market and Cafe opened in August from a couple who wanted to introduce coffee, pastries, savory salads, stuffed meatballs, and more dishes from Armenia’s capital, Yerevan, to Washingtonians.

2204 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

20. Jack Rose Dining Saloon

2007 18th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
People sit at the bar at Jack Rose Dining Saloon
Jack Rose’s bar boasts one of the most extensive whiskey collections in the country.
Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Whiskey reigns supreme at this local favorite, which boasts a high-end dining area and open-air terrace. The menu skews Southern, offering dishes like jalapeno hushpuppies with Crystal hot sauce mayo, whiskey wings, pork chops with sorghum mustard, and bourbon pecan tarts. The open-air terrace on top is heated, and there's also a seasonal tiki bar upstairs.

2007 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

21. The Imperial

2001 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
Barstools at the Imperial
Barstools at the Imperial
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Jack Rose Dining Saloon’s owners spared no expense with this sleek, multi-story sequel, which opened in 2019 with a focus on seafood and Southern-leaning dishes. Stop here for cocktails and oysters during happy hour, or a newly-added weekend brunch. Dram & Grain, the dark basement bar equipped with a fireplace, has more of a speakeasy vibe.

2001 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

22. Lucky Buns

2000 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
A double burger from Lucky Buns
A double burger from Lucky Buns
Lucky Buns [official]

Burgers are the raison d’être for Lucky Buns, where diners can top their patties with everything from hatch green chile to pickled beet relish or tonkatsu sauce. There are plenty of chicken sandwich options, too. Don’t skip an order of curry-flavored fries.

2000 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

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