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Former Fiola Mare chef de cuisine Colin Clark opened Via Sophia in the Hamilton Hotel in June.
Former Fiola Mare chef de cuisine Colin Clark opened Via Sophia in the Hamilton Hotel in June.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

The 15 Hottest Restaurants in D.C., July 2019

Where to eat right now around the DMV

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Former Fiola Mare chef de cuisine Colin Clark opened Via Sophia in the Hamilton Hotel in June.
| Photo by Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Readers, friends and family often come to Eater editors with one question: “Where should I eat right now?” Restaurant obsessives want to know what’s new, what’s exciting, which favorite chef just opened a new place. And while the Eater 38 is a crucial resource covering standbys and essentials across the city, it is not a chronicle of the ‘it’ places of the moment. Enter the Eater Heatmap, which will change monthly to highlight where discerning diners are flocking to right now.

Now leaving the hot list: Estuary, Prima, Punjab Grill, Zeppelin

New to the hot list: Cherry, Chop Shop Taco, Shilling Canning Company, Via Sophia

For all the latest Washington D.C. dining intel, subscribe to Eater DC’s newsletter.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. Queen’s English

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3410 11th St NW
Washington, DC 20010

Owners Henji Cheung and Sarah Thompson arrive from New York with warm smiles and a charming story. He’s the husband and chef trading in the Italian noodles he used to make for a lineup of Hong Kong-style dishes cribbed from his mother’s kitchen. She’s the wife and general manager stirring up cocktails with Chinese herbal syrup and sourcing natural wines from everywhere from Greece to Texas. Together they spend their days doing prep work for 24-hour golden chicken, twice-cooked lamb ribs, and steamed egg custard. A no-reservations policy means people may have to be patient to land a table.

Queen’s English golden chicken
Golden chicken from Queen’s English
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

2. Seven Reasons

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2208 14th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 290-2630
Visit Website

The brick-lined townhome that used to house Piola reemerged in April as an ivy-covered Latin fusion destination, starring artfully presented dishes from an acclaimed Venezuelan chef. Chef Enrique Limardo most recently made a name for himself in Baltimore, helming Alma Cocina Latina for the past five years. For his first D.C. venture, Limardo presents his menu in seven sections: snacks, small plates, medium plates, large plates, desserts, cocktails, and wines. The format aims to unite flavors from his native country with those from Peru, the Amazon rainforest, and the Caribbean. The space just grew with the addition of a patio area for 30, outfitted with lounge seating and a full bar. 

Cauliflower tempura from Seven Reasons
Jen Chase/For Seven Reasons

3. Patsy's American

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8051 Leesburg Pike
Vienna, VA 22182
(703) 552-5100
Visit Website

The latest piece of Great American Restaurant Group’s three-piece culinary complex in Tysons Corner is a soaring 300-seat destination serving all-star dishes from the prolific restaurant group’s regional portfolio (Sweetwater Tavern, Carlyle, and Mike’s “American” grill, to name a few). Look around the old railway station-inspired venue to spot a real Picasso and sprawling mural of political legends at dinner. Along with a raw bar slinging oyster shooters, a late-night menu at its 150-seat back bar features a top-selling fried chicken sandwich served until 2 a.m. daily.

A lobster roll with corn and fries from Patsy’s American
A lobster roll with corn and fries from Patsy’s American
Rey Lopez/For Patsy’s

4. Hanumanh

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1604 7th St NW
Washington, DC 20001

Covered in vibrant murals and masks of its namesake monkey deity, Hanumanh is the next bold step forward for mother-and-son chefs Seng Luangrath and Bobby Pradachith, D.C.’s leaders of the Lao food movement. At their bar-centric spot in Shaw, customers can find potently fermented flavors and fistfuls of herbs that represent the tiny Southeastern Asian country of Laos. Luangrath and Pradachith are collaborating on new dishes — think char-grilled scallops in a green curry sauce augmented with pounded rice — while barmini alum Al Thompson is mixing up cocktails and zero-proof drinks.

Hanumanh puffed rice
Naem khao kob is a puffed rice salad with tamarind sauce
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

5. Stellina Pizzeria

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399 Morse St NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 851-3995
Visit Website

Stellina Pizzeria brought the booming Union Market neighborhood a whimsical atmosphere for patiently fermented pizza crust, Don Ciccio cocktails, house-made pasta, and street foods from Italy’s southern coast. Chef Matteo Venini and restaurateur Antonio Matarazzo worked together at Lupo Verde. Fans of Venini’s cacio e pepe can sample the Italian staple in both pasta and pizza form. Another white pie is blanketed in mortadella. Other recommended orders include Sicilian arancini, a breaded swordfish sandwich, and an eggplant Parmesan-based Il Cuzzetiello panino built on pizza dough. The owners’ European fashion sense is evident inside, with artwork of a legendary Italian comedian sporting a colorful suit by Dolce & Gabbana. 

An octopus and burrata panino and several pizzas from Stellina Pizzeria
Meaghan Webster/For Stellina

6. Via Sophia

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1001 14th St NW
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 218-7575
Visit Website

The month-old modern replacement to the historic Hamilton Hotel’s outdated 14K restaurant is attracting a fresh crop of customers craving Southern Italian fare and pizzas parading out of a Neapolitan wood-fired oven. Executive chef Colin Clark, the former chef de cuisine at Fabio Trabocchi’s Fiola Mare, weaves lots of fish dishes into the menu at the the 96-seat restaurant. There are three types of crudo to go with black bass accented with asparagus tips and whole branzino built for two. Don’t miss the gnocchi with Maryland crab and sea scallops. Adjacent lobby bar, Society, is ideal for an after-dinner drink.

7. Laos in Town

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250 K St NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 864-6620
Visit Website

NoMa’s consistently-packed modern destination for Southeast Asian cuisine just got an early two-star review from Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema. Phet, aka ”spicy,” orders that pair well with ice cold Laotian beer include a fiery green papaya salad filled with chiles, veggies, Laos pork loaf, and fermented fish sauce. Another rec is the mok pla (steamed basa fish), hidden inside a banana leaf with a curry paste and Laotian herb mix. Its experienced Thai team includes owner Nick Ongsangkoon (partner at Foggy Bottom’s essential Thai spot Soi 38) and executive chef Ben Tiatasin, who gained kitchen experience working at Esaan, McLean’s lauded Northeastern Thai restaurant.

Laos in Town papaya salad
Papaya salad from Laos in Town
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

8. Thamee

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1320 H St NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 750-6529
Visit Website

There may be no better ambassador for Burmese food in D.C. than Jocelyn Law-Yone, the retired English and Art history teacher donning an apron covered in patterns inspired by tribal textiles to cook dishes she grew up on in the capital city of Rangoon (now Yangon). Law-Yone, her daughter Simone Jacobson, and business partner Eric Wang have now expanded from Toli Moli, their Burmese bodega in Union Market, to a full-blown restaurant in the former Sally’s Middle Name space on H Street NE. There customers can find lahpet thoke, a traditional salad of fermented tea leaves mixed with other veggies, sesame seeds, and crunchy broad beans, as well as a range of snacks, noodles, and curries that will give many Washingtonians a memorable introduction to the cuisine.

9. Cane

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403 H St NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 675-2011
Visit Website

Trinidadian-born Peter Prime and his sister Jeanine are recreating the vibes of rum shops from back home in this narrow restaurant on H Street NE. Prime turns his fine-dining pedigree towards doubles — rounds of fry-bread stuffed with curried chickpeas and spicy chutney — grilled oxtails, and smoked coconut soft serve. Fresh juices make up the base of rum-heavy cocktails and punches.

Trinidadian doubles from Cane.
Gabe Hiatt/Eater D.C.

10. Cherry

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515 15th St NW
Washington, DC 20004
(202) 661-2400
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A $50 million renovation to the W Washington DC includes an opened up restaurant in the lobby powered by a 15-foot wood-burning hearth, billed as the largest in the D.C. area. Without the aid of gas burners, chef Will Morris (formerly of Vermillion) is taming the flames with an enclosed firebox for gentle smoking and two wood-burning ovens. Early standouts include a plate of oven-roasted shrimp — in a rich sauce with chorizo, caper berries, piquillo peppers, herbs, and butter — and a grilled rockfish in cilantro lime butter atop a helping of creamy farro.

11. La Esquina de Clarendon

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2900 Wilson Blvd Suite 103
Arlington, VA 22201
(703) 888-1259
Visit Website

Ambar owner Ivan Iricanin recruited chef Gerardo Vázquez Lugo, one of the most famous faces in the Mexican culinary world, to design the menus at this three-level complex in Clarendon. Buena Vida, the second-story dining room, gives Vázquez Lugo a chance to give history lessons about the country’s diverse heritage with dishes such as tableside Caesar salad from Tijuana and shellfish pozole from Colima. On the first floor, Tacos, Tequila, Tortas (TTT) is a more casual venue for Mexico City-style street food. A rooftop bar, dubbed Buena Vida Social Club, was the last to open, serving open-faced crab sandwiches, beef tartare tostadas, and build-your-own shrimp taco platters.

Buena Vida tropical ceviche
Tropical ceviche from Buena Vida
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

12. Hot Lola's

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4238 Wilson Blvd Level C
Arlington, VA 22203

With his counter in the new Quarter Market food hall in Ballston, Himitsu chef Kevin Tien gives Nashville hot chicken a Sichuan-laced twist. Fried chicken comes in four spice levels (too hot, O.G. hot, dry hot, not hot) with an assist from a crisp made of numbing peppers, fennel seeds, star anise, and Thai chiles. Elsewhere in the complex, people can head to a sit-down soccer bar, Copa Kitchen, that serves Spanish comfort foods and sangria samplers. Turu’s, a New York-style pizza place from Timber Pizza Co., is also inside the market.

A hot chicken sandwich from Hot Lola’s
Hot Lola’s [official]

13. Shilling Canning Company

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360 Water St SE
Washington, DC 20003

Chef-owner Reid Shilling’s long-delayed passion project in Navy Yard draws from Mid-Atlantic traditions from his Baltimore-area upbringing, Southern touches from his time as sous chef at the Dabney, and the ingredient-first approach he studied at Thomas Keller’s Bouchon Bistro in Napa Valley. Named after the farm and processing business run by Shilling’s great uncles, the restaurant will ramp up canning and meat-curing production throughout the summer. Following its early July opening, customers can expect to order from an ample raw bar and sample small plates like a salad of heirloom tomatoes, preserved cucumbers, purple basil, and fried squash blossoms, or larger dishes like a wood-grilled lobster in bourbon lobster butter with grits and pole beans on the side.

The bar at Shilling Canning Company
The bar at Shilling Canning Company
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

14. Mama Chang

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3251 Old Lee Hwy Ste101
Fairfax, VA 22030
(703) 268-5556
Visit Website

Peter Chang’s grand return to Fairfax, where the former embassy chef first developed a culinary following while cooking under pseudonyms, is this home-style Chinese restaurant that honors the women in his life with fiery dishes from his native Hubei province along with signature Sichuan specialities. Check out ultra-buttery sesame shaobing brad from the pastry expert expert Lisa Chang, the chef’s wife. People with a high tolerance for heat will want to check out the family-style flounder pot laced with pickled peppers.

Mama Chang dumplings.
Pan-fried pork dumplings from Mama Chang.
Rey Lopez/For Mama Chang

15. Chop Shop Taco

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1008 Madison St
Alexandria, VA 22314
(571) 970-6438
Visit Website

A sleepy industrial strip near the Braddock Road metro came to life in May with the arrival of a ‘90s hip-hop playing, taco-and-tequila slinging bar packed into a converted auto body shop. A large colorful mural reading “chop it up” sets the tone for chef Ed McIntosh’s mash-up menu that incorporates chopped meats roasted on a spit (duck, whole chickens, ribeye) and tortillas made with heirloom Mexican corn. It’s all delivered to communal tables in shiny silver camping bowls.

Chop Shop Taco
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

1. Queen’s English

3410 11th St NW, Washington, DC 20010
Queen’s English golden chicken
Golden chicken from Queen’s English
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Owners Henji Cheung and Sarah Thompson arrive from New York with warm smiles and a charming story. He’s the husband and chef trading in the Italian noodles he used to make for a lineup of Hong Kong-style dishes cribbed from his mother’s kitchen. She’s the wife and general manager stirring up cocktails with Chinese herbal syrup and sourcing natural wines from everywhere from Greece to Texas. Together they spend their days doing prep work for 24-hour golden chicken, twice-cooked lamb ribs, and steamed egg custard. A no-reservations policy means people may have to be patient to land a table.

3410 11th St NW
Washington, DC 20010

2. Seven Reasons

2208 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20009
Cauliflower tempura from Seven Reasons
Jen Chase/For Seven Reasons

The brick-lined townhome that used to house Piola reemerged in April as an ivy-covered Latin fusion destination, starring artfully presented dishes from an acclaimed Venezuelan chef. Chef Enrique Limardo most recently made a name for himself in Baltimore, helming Alma Cocina Latina for the past five years. For his first D.C. venture, Limardo presents his menu in seven sections: snacks, small plates, medium plates, large plates, desserts, cocktails, and wines. The format aims to unite flavors from his native country with those from Peru, the Amazon rainforest, and the Caribbean. The space just grew with the addition of a patio area for 30, outfitted with lounge seating and a full bar. 

2208 14th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

3. Patsy's American

8051 Leesburg Pike, Vienna, VA 22182
A lobster roll with corn and fries from Patsy’s American
A lobster roll with corn and fries from Patsy’s American
Rey Lopez/For Patsy’s

The latest piece of Great American Restaurant Group’s three-piece culinary complex in Tysons Corner is a soaring 300-seat destination serving all-star dishes from the prolific restaurant group’s regional portfolio (Sweetwater Tavern, Carlyle, and Mike’s “American” grill, to name a few). Look around the old railway station-inspired venue to spot a real Picasso and sprawling mural of political legends at dinner. Along with a raw bar slinging oyster shooters, a late-night menu at its 150-seat back bar features a top-selling fried chicken sandwich served until 2 a.m. daily.

8051 Leesburg Pike
Vienna, VA 22182

4. Hanumanh

1604 7th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Hanumanh puffed rice
Naem khao kob is a puffed rice salad with tamarind sauce
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Covered in vibrant murals and masks of its namesake monkey deity, Hanumanh is the next bold step forward for mother-and-son chefs Seng Luangrath and Bobby Pradachith, D.C.’s leaders of the Lao food movement. At their bar-centric spot in Shaw, customers can find potently fermented flavors and fistfuls of herbs that represent the tiny Southeastern Asian country of Laos. Luangrath and Pradachith are collaborating on new dishes — think char-grilled scallops in a green curry sauce augmented with pounded rice — while barmini alum Al Thompson is mixing up cocktails and zero-proof drinks.

1604 7th St NW
Washington, DC 20001

5. Stellina Pizzeria

399 Morse St NE, Washington, DC 20002
An octopus and burrata panino and several pizzas from Stellina Pizzeria
Meaghan Webster/For Stellina

Stellina Pizzeria brought the booming Union Market neighborhood a whimsical atmosphere for patiently fermented pizza crust, Don Ciccio cocktails, house-made pasta, and street foods from Italy’s southern coast. Chef Matteo Venini and restaurateur Antonio Matarazzo worked together at Lupo Verde. Fans of Venini’s cacio e pepe can sample the Italian staple in both pasta and pizza form. Another white pie is blanketed in mortadella. Other recommended orders include Sicilian arancini, a breaded swordfish sandwich, and an eggplant Parmesan-based Il Cuzzetiello panino built on pizza dough. The owners’ European fashion sense is evident inside, with artwork of a legendary Italian comedian sporting a colorful suit by Dolce & Gabbana. 

399 Morse St NE
Washington, DC 20002

6. Via Sophia

1001 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20005

The month-old modern replacement to the historic Hamilton Hotel’s outdated 14K restaurant is attracting a fresh crop of customers craving Southern Italian fare and pizzas parading out of a Neapolitan wood-fired oven. Executive chef Colin Clark, the former chef de cuisine at Fabio Trabocchi’s Fiola Mare, weaves lots of fish dishes into the menu at the the 96-seat restaurant. There are three types of crudo to go with black bass accented with asparagus tips and whole branzino built for two. Don’t miss the gnocchi with Maryland crab and sea scallops. Adjacent lobby bar, Society, is ideal for an after-dinner drink.

1001 14th St NW
Washington, DC 20005

7. Laos in Town

250 K St NE, Washington, DC 20002
Laos in Town papaya salad
Papaya salad from Laos in Town
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

NoMa’s consistently-packed modern destination for Southeast Asian cuisine just got an early two-star review from Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema. Phet, aka ”spicy,” orders that pair well with ice cold Laotian beer include a fiery green papaya salad filled with chiles, veggies, Laos pork loaf, and fermented fish sauce. Another rec is the mok pla (steamed basa fish), hidden inside a banana leaf with a curry paste and Laotian herb mix. Its experienced Thai team includes owner Nick Ongsangkoon (partner at Foggy Bottom’s essential Thai spot Soi 38) and executive chef Ben Tiatasin, who gained kitchen experience working at Esaan, McLean’s lauded Northeastern Thai restaurant.

250 K St NE
Washington, DC 20002

8. Thamee

1320 H St NE, Washington, DC 20002

There may be no better ambassador for Burmese food in D.C. than Jocelyn Law-Yone, the retired English and Art history teacher donning an apron covered in patterns inspired by tribal textiles to cook dishes she grew up on in the capital city of Rangoon (now Yangon). Law-Yone, her daughter Simone Jacobson, and business partner Eric Wang have now expanded from Toli Moli, their Burmese bodega in Union Market, to a full-blown restaurant in the former Sally’s Middle Name space on H Street NE. There customers can find lahpet thoke, a traditional salad of fermented tea leaves mixed with other veggies, sesame seeds, and crunchy broad beans, as well as a range of snacks, noodles, and curries that will give many Washingtonians a memorable introduction to the cuisine.

1320 H St NE
Washington, DC 20002

9. Cane

403 H St NE, Washington, DC 20002
Trinidadian doubles from Cane.
Gabe Hiatt/Eater D.C.

Trinidadian-born Peter Prime and his sister Jeanine are recreating the vibes of rum shops from back home in this narrow restaurant on H Street NE. Prime turns his fine-dining pedigree towards doubles — rounds of fry-bread stuffed with curried chickpeas and spicy chutney — grilled oxtails, and smoked coconut soft serve. Fresh juices make up the base of rum-heavy cocktails and punches.

403 H St NE
Washington, DC 20002

10. Cherry

515 15th St NW, Washington, DC 20004

A $50 million renovation to the W Washington DC includes an opened up restaurant in the lobby powered by a 15-foot wood-burning hearth, billed as the largest in the D.C. area. Without the aid of gas burners, chef Will Morris (formerly of Vermillion) is taming the flames with an enclosed firebox for gentle smoking and two wood-burning ovens. Early standouts include a plate of oven-roasted shrimp — in a rich sauce with chorizo, caper berries, piquillo peppers, herbs, and butter — and a grilled rockfish in cilantro lime butter atop a helping of creamy farro.

515 15th St NW
Washington, DC 20004

11. La Esquina de Clarendon

2900 Wilson Blvd Suite 103, Arlington, VA 22201
Buena Vida tropical ceviche
Tropical ceviche from Buena Vida
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Ambar owner Ivan Iricanin recruited chef Gerardo Vázquez Lugo, one of the most famous faces in the Mexican culinary world, to design the menus at this three-level complex in Clarendon. Buena Vida, the second-story dining room, gives Vázquez Lugo a chance to give history lessons about the country’s diverse heritage with dishes such as tableside Caesar salad from Tijuana and shellfish pozole from Colima. On the first floor, Tacos, Tequila, Tortas (TTT) is a more casual venue for Mexico City-style street food. A rooftop bar, dubbed Buena Vida Social Club, was the last to open, serving open-faced crab sandwiches, beef tartare tostadas, and build-your-own shrimp taco platters.

2900 Wilson Blvd Suite 103
Arlington, VA 22201

12. Hot Lola's

4238 Wilson Blvd Level C, Arlington, VA 22203
A hot chicken sandwich from Hot Lola’s
Hot Lola’s [official]

With his counter in the new Quarter Market food hall in Ballston, Himitsu chef Kevin Tien gives Nashville hot chicken a Sichuan-laced twist. Fried chicken comes in four spice levels (too hot, O.G. hot, dry hot, not hot) with an assist from a crisp made of numbing peppers, fennel seeds, star anise, and Thai chiles. Elsewhere in the complex, people can head to a sit-down soccer bar, Copa Kitchen, that serves Spanish comfort foods and sangria samplers. Turu’s, a New York-style pizza place from Timber Pizza Co., is also inside the market.

4238 Wilson Blvd Level C
Arlington, VA 22203

13. Shilling Canning Company

360 Water St SE, Washington, DC 20003
The bar at Shilling Canning Company
The bar at Shilling Canning Company
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Chef-owner Reid Shilling’s long-delayed passion project in Navy Yard draws from Mid-Atlantic traditions from his Baltimore-area upbringing, Southern touches from his time as sous chef at the Dabney, and the ingredient-first approach he studied at Thomas Keller’s Bouchon Bistro in Napa Valley. Named after the farm and processing business run by Shilling’s great uncles, the restaurant will ramp up canning and meat-curing production throughout the summer. Following its early July opening, customers can expect to order from an ample raw bar and sample small plates like a salad of heirloom tomatoes, preserved cucumbers, purple basil, and fried squash blossoms, or larger dishes like a wood-grilled lobster in bourbon lobster butter with grits and pole beans on the side.

360 Water St SE
Washington, DC 20003

14. Mama Chang

3251 Old Lee Hwy Ste101, Fairfax, VA 22030
Mama Chang dumplings.
Pan-fried pork dumplings from Mama Chang.
Rey Lopez/For Mama Chang

Peter Chang’s grand return to Fairfax, where the former embassy chef first developed a culinary following while cooking under pseudonyms, is this home-style Chinese restaurant that honors the women in his life with fiery dishes from his native Hubei province along with signature Sichuan specialities. Check out ultra-buttery sesame shaobing brad from the pastry expert expert Lisa Chang, the chef’s wife. People with a high tolerance for heat will want to check out the family-style flounder pot laced with pickled peppers.

3251 Old Lee Hwy Ste101
Fairfax, VA 22030

15. Chop Shop Taco

1008 Madison St, Alexandria, VA 22314
Chop Shop Taco
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

A sleepy industrial strip near the Braddock Road metro came to life in May with the arrival of a ‘90s hip-hop playing, taco-and-tequila slinging bar packed into a converted auto body shop. A large colorful mural reading “chop it up” sets the tone for chef Ed McIntosh’s mash-up menu that incorporates chopped meats roasted on a spit (duck, whole chickens, ribeye) and tortillas made with heirloom Mexican corn. It’s all delivered to communal tables in shiny silver camping bowls.

1008 Madison St
Alexandria, VA 22314

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