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A medley of duck, beef, vegetable curries, and murtani served with homemade paratha bread at St. James.
Melena DeFlorimonte for St. James

The 15 Hottest New Restaurants Around D.C., June 2022

Where to find Mexican street foods, fancy Indian tasting menus, fiery papaya salads, and more

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A medley of duck, beef, vegetable curries, and murtani served with homemade paratha bread at St. James.
| Melena DeFlorimonte for St. James

Eater writers and editors always get the same question. Friends, family, acquaintances, and randos all want to know, “Where should I eat right now?” That’s where the Eater Heatmap enters the conversation, pointing diners toward the most intriguing or otherwise buzzworthy new restaurants in the D.C. area. This list considers restaurants that have been open for six months or less. For our map of the D.C. area’s 38 essential restaurants, go here.

New to the map this month: St. James, for modern Caribbean fare on 14th Street NW; Boogy and Peel, for ‘Big Mac’ pizzas in Dupont; Taqueria Al Lado II, for top-tier tortillas off H Street; Rania, for a luxe Indian reboot in Penn Quarter; and Sura, for Bangkok street foods and cocktails in Dupont.

Leaving the list: Eko House, Mariscos 1133, Nighthawk, and Sticx

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.
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1. Hello Betty

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940 Rose Ave
North Bethesda, MD 20852
(301) 389-5840
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Pretend you’re at a surfside crab boil (instead of in North Bethesda) at Hello Betty, which serves seafood feasts like blue crabs tossed in Old Bay vinegar with potatoes and corn on the cob. The restaurant at the Canopy by Hilton in the Pike & Rose development is modeled after the original Hello Betty located in Oceanside, California. That translates to Baja-esque decor at this new location, with some East Coast touches too, like Natty Boh served on ice in Igloo coolers and a fried chicken sandwich slathered in mumbo sauce. e & Rose neighborhood, has officially opened its Boat Bar for the summer season. A repurposed 40-foot boat that functions as a full-service bar debuted on the patio in late May, as did daily happy hour and weekend brunch.

Crabs in a basket and a cooler of beer Scott Suchman for Hello Betty

2. Han Palace

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2649 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20008
(571) 378-0162
Visit Website

Tysons Corner dim sum destination Han Palace branched out with a D.C. location in Woodley Park (another is headed to Barracks Row soon). While there aren’t pushcarts, dim sum dishes like roasted pork buns and scallion pancakes head out of the kitchen to order, along with Peking duck and homemade soup dumplings.

A tree in the middle of a dining room Han Palace

3. St. James - Modern Caribbean

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2017 14th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

While Eater DC’s 2019 Chef of the Year Peter Prime is no longer involved (and now cooking at Bammy’s), his sister Jeanine Prime pushed the long-awaited culinary ode to their native Trinidad past the finish line in May. St. James, named after the bustling district in Trinidad’s capital, Port of Spain, breathes life into brick-lined Quarter + Glory’s former home. At 2,800 square feet, the remodeled space with an incoming 14th Street NW patio is almost three times larger than its popular H Street NE sibling Cane, which focuses on Caribbean street foods. A list of rum-forward, floral cocktails like a hibiscus highball comes from Service Bar’s Glendon Hartley, who’s the son of West Indian immigrants. Small and large-format dishes that pay homage to the melting pot port city include West Africa’s callaloo, a stew full of leafy greens, Trini-style Chinese steamed buns stuffed with spicy pork, and curry crab.

4. SURA Restaurant

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2016 P St NW
Washington, DC 20036
(202) 450-6282
Visit Website

A family-run underground lounge just debuted in Dupont with a star cast of Thai talent behind the wheel. Former sushi chef Billy Thammasathiti teamed up his aunt behind the popular Fat Nomads supper club to kick off Sura’s service with a “One Night In Bangkok”-themed June residency. Andy Thammasathiti of Baltimore’s Mayuree Thai Tavern whips up passion fruit daiquiris and Sichuan baijiu cocktails to go along with an opening street foods menu full of quail egg wontons, spicy crudo, fiery papaya salads, and spicy beef or pork skewers. The 50-seat newcomer swings open at 4 p.m., with walk-ins welcome but reservations encouraged.

5. Boogy and Peel

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1 Dupont Cir NW
Washington, DC 20036

Rose’s Luxury alum Rachael Jennings breaks out of the fine-dining world with a new “bastardized Neapolitanpizza place for Dupont. One pie takes tips from McD’s Big Mac, while another cold cut and fontina-topped pizza mimics the taste of the popular G-Man Italian sub at Capitol Hill’s Mangialardo. The eatery’s playful spirit is evident in everything from her pizzeria’s name (Boogy is a tribute to her beloved dog), a 30-seat dining room with bright blue tones and neon signage and squiggles, and the names of the pizzas (one of the pies is her friend’s Instagram handle).

Boogy & Peel’s opening menu focuses in on comfort food pizzas, salad, and wings.
Boogy & Peel

6. Dovetail

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1430 Rhode Island Ave NW
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 742-3100
Visit Website

An indoor-outdoor destination for artfully plated dishes from a tenured chef debuted in May on the first floor of the the posh, 178-room Viceroy Washington D.C., bringing Logan Circle a chic new spot to try trout roe-topped hushpuppies, bright spring asparagus soup poured tableside, grilled Spanish octopus, and plump Roseda Farm burgers. Chef James Gee, who used to feed celebrities at Hamptons hotspot Cittanuova, has amassed an impressive local resume at the helm of Jaleo, China Chilcano, and most recently, I’m Eddie Cano. Dovetail, open for dinner to start, sends out local brews, color-soaked cocktails, and RdV wines from a glossy bar.

Roseda Farm dry-aged strip steak with braised veal cheek, potato fondue, charred leeks, and spring herbs salad at Dovetail.
Scott Suchman/Dovetail

7. Causa/Bar Amazonia

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920 Blagden Alley NW
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 629-3942
Visit Website

There are two levels to explore at this much-anticipated Blagden Alley restaurant, both of which celebrates the best of Peruvian ingredients and cooking techniques. Downstairs, the minimalist Causa will send out a six-course menu showcasing the cuisine of Peru’s coastline and Andes mountains. It’s more of a party upstairs at the leafy Bar Amazonia, which opened first with meat skewers, ceviches, and street food snacks — and aromatic cocktails like a gin and tonic made with Peruvian cinchona bark and a huge collection of pisco.

Scallops in a shell
Scallops at Causa.
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

8. SHŌTŌ Washington DC

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1100 15th St NW
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 796-0011
Visit Website

Three years in the making, Midtown Center’s scene-y Japanese showpiece brings D.C. a symmetrically pleasing sushi counter, wide Japanese spirits selection, and robata grill that cooks an array of fish, meats, skewers, poultry, and produce. London-based restaurateur Arjun Waney’s collective of brands also includes Zuma, a high-end sushi and izakaya concept with 18 locations around the world. The group’s go-to designer, Noriyoshi Muramatsu of Tokyo-based Studio Glit, is behind a luxe look largely assembled and sourced in Japan.

SHŌTŌ’s open kitchen.
Rey Lopez for Shōtō

9. Stellina Pizzeria

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508 K St NW
Washington, DC 20001
(202) 499-2094
Visit Website

Stellina Pizzeria, known for cacio e pepe pizza and fried snacks, just opened up a third location with retro diner roots on K Street. Stellina replicated D.C.’s old Waffle Shop and inserted original details like its serpentine bar to go along with a huge Marra Forni pizza oven and murals of Italian film stars. In honor of the diner’s history, the Mount Vernon outpost’s menu includes a waffle panini.

Stellina’s Amatriciana pie (tomato sauce, guanciale, red onions, mozzarella, pecorino romano). 
Rey Lopez/Stellina

10. Taqueria Al Lado II

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809 12th St NE
Washington, DC 20002

The pint-sized box that housed D.C. fried fish institution Horace and Dickie’s for three decades flipped in May into a Mexican street food stand centered around tequila and top-notch tortillas. Chef Rolando Frias opened the original Taqueria Al Lado in Adams Morgan last spring and quickly drew attention for being one of the few spots in town that grinds its own masa on-site. At its sophomore location across town, patrons choose a taco, quesadilla, huarache, or salad and a protein from a list that includes al pastor, lengua, chicken tinga, vegan barbacoa, tempura-battered cod, and more. Taqueria Al Lado II is smaller than the first, with just eight seats inside plus a 12-seat patio out front.

11. Fog Point at Assembly

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1700 N Moore St
Arlington, VA 22209
(703) 419-3156
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A bright, 50-seat raw bar tucked off the Rosslyn Metro station brings a taste of the Atlantic coast to the center of Arlington’s skyscraper-filled neighborhood. The full-service addition to Rosslyn’s Assembly food hall, which sports its own entrance off Fort Myer Drive, opened in March with three types of shucked-to-order East Coast oysters to start. The glossy, nautical-themed setup also serves Maryland crab soup; salmon “flights” of the fish prepared three ways; and non-seafood options like chicken paella. Cocktails include a Grey Goose martini, negroni, French 75, and spins on classics like a mint julep engineered with reposado and yellow chartreuse. For dessert, homemade pies include key lime, caramel apple, and chocolate banana.

12. Rania

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427 11th St NW
Washington, DC 20004

The palace-like Penn Quarter space that formerly housed Punjab Grill reopened this week as a luxe new Indian restaurant called Rania, which means “Queen” in Hindi and Sanskrit. Chef Chetan Shetty, who recently cooked at acclaimed New Delhi restaurant Indian Accent, guides diners through a multi-course dinner of inventive Indian cuisine that goes way beyond the expected (as in dishes like braised lamb shank accented with spinach, coconut foam, ghoda masala spice blend, and mustard frills). The 4,700-square-foot showpiece from international restaurateur Karan Singh drew lots of attention when it opened in 2019. Unlike Punjab Grill, Rania will focus on prix-fixe menu of either three courses ($75) or four courses ($90). An a la carte menu will be available at the restaurant’s Sundowner Bar.

Rania’s namesake cocktail comes with Jin Jiji Gin, Zirbenz, pine liqueur, lime, and tea cordial.
Greg Powers for Rania

13. Harvey's

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513 W Broad St
Falls Church, VA 22046
(540) 268-6100
Visit Website

The all-day American eatery and market with a knack for local produce, meats, wine, and beer comes from first-time restaurant owner and Virginia native Thomas Harvey, an alum of PartisanRed Apron Butcher, and Tuskie’s Restaurant Group in Virginia. Downtown Falls Church guests can kick off the day with La Colombe coffee and egg sandwiches, followed by fried calamari, fire-roasted onion dip, Bavarian pretzels with beer cheese, burgers, and pastrami sandwiches. Homey mains include spaghetti carbonara, porter-braised Seven Hills beef short ribs, a chicken Cobb salad, and steak frites, all served on decorative vintage plates.

Deviled eggs on a plate
Deviled eggs topped with pimento cheese, candied bacon, and chicharróns.
Butcher Photography/Harvey’s

14. Santa Rosa Taqueria

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301 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
Washington, DC 20003

Roasted harissa cauliflower tacos and al pastor tacos made with meat from a gyro wrapped around a pineapple make the menu at the re-opened Santa Rosa Taqueria. It’s in a new Capitol Hill location right next to the original, which shut down with the pandemic. Santa Rosa 2.0 includes a lengthy margarita list from mixologist Gina Chersevani of Buffalo & Bergen and a colorful Day of the Dead-themed mural in the dining room.

Fried shrimp tacos Santa Rosa Taqueria

15. Newland

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327 7th St SE unit A
Washington, DC 20003
(202) 525-1395
Visit Website

Beuchert’s Saloon chef Andrew Markert takes more of a refined approach at his chic, modern American restaurant on Capitol Hill, where tasting menus start at $80. A parade of plates embrace Mid-Atlantic ingredients and Markert’s cuisine-hopping resume at places like Michel Richard’s Citronelle and Gracie’s in Providence, Rhode Island. Newland, named after the Baltimore road where Markert lived as a kid, sends out charred scallops with crab fat powder, crispy pata with kumquat ragu and peppercorn jus, and dry-aged koji strip steak with beet bordelaise. Beuchert’s longtime beverage director Mackenzie Conway plays up lesser-known cocktails and spirits behind a sleek, five-seat bar.

Caviar service in a box
Luxe caviar add-ons arrive in retro lunch boxes at Newland.
Kimberly Kong for Newland

1. Hello Betty

940 Rose Ave, North Bethesda, MD 20852
Crabs in a basket and a cooler of beer Scott Suchman for Hello Betty

Pretend you’re at a surfside crab boil (instead of in North Bethesda) at Hello Betty, which serves seafood feasts like blue crabs tossed in Old Bay vinegar with potatoes and corn on the cob. The restaurant at the Canopy by Hilton in the Pike & Rose development is modeled after the original Hello Betty located in Oceanside, California. That translates to Baja-esque decor at this new location, with some East Coast touches too, like Natty Boh served on ice in Igloo coolers and a fried chicken sandwich slathered in mumbo sauce. e & Rose neighborhood, has officially opened its Boat Bar for the summer season. A repurposed 40-foot boat that functions as a full-service bar debuted on the patio in late May, as did daily happy hour and weekend brunch.

940 Rose Ave
North Bethesda, MD 20852

2. Han Palace

2649 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008
A tree in the middle of a dining room Han Palace

Tysons Corner dim sum destination Han Palace branched out with a D.C. location in Woodley Park (another is headed to Barracks Row soon). While there aren’t pushcarts, dim sum dishes like roasted pork buns and scallion pancakes head out of the kitchen to order, along with Peking duck and homemade soup dumplings.

2649 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC 20008

3. St. James - Modern Caribbean

2017 14th St NW, Washington, DC 20009

While Eater DC’s 2019 Chef of the Year Peter Prime is no longer involved (and now cooking at Bammy’s), his sister Jeanine Prime pushed the long-awaited culinary ode to their native Trinidad past the finish line in May. St. James, named after the bustling district in Trinidad’s capital, Port of Spain, breathes life into brick-lined Quarter + Glory’s former home. At 2,800 square feet, the remodeled space with an incoming 14th Street NW patio is almost three times larger than its popular H Street NE sibling Cane, which focuses on Caribbean street foods. A list of rum-forward, floral cocktails like a hibiscus highball comes from Service Bar’s Glendon Hartley, who’s the son of West Indian immigrants. Small and large-format dishes that pay homage to the melting pot port city include West Africa’s callaloo, a stew full of leafy greens, Trini-style Chinese steamed buns stuffed with spicy pork, and curry crab.

2017 14th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

4. SURA Restaurant

2016 P St NW, Washington, DC 20036

A family-run underground lounge just debuted in Dupont with a star cast of Thai talent behind the wheel. Former sushi chef Billy Thammasathiti teamed up his aunt behind the popular Fat Nomads supper club to kick off Sura’s service with a “One Night In Bangkok”-themed June residency. Andy Thammasathiti of Baltimore’s Mayuree Thai Tavern whips up passion fruit daiquiris and Sichuan baijiu cocktails to go along with an opening street foods menu full of quail egg wontons, spicy crudo, fiery papaya salads, and spicy beef or pork skewers. The 50-seat newcomer swings open at 4 p.m., with walk-ins welcome but reservations encouraged.

2016 P St NW
Washington, DC 20036

5. Boogy and Peel

1 Dupont Cir NW, Washington, DC 20036
Boogy & Peel’s opening menu focuses in on comfort food pizzas, salad, and wings.
Boogy & Peel

Rose’s Luxury alum Rachael Jennings breaks out of the fine-dining world with a new “bastardized Neapolitanpizza place for Dupont. One pie takes tips from McD’s Big Mac, while another cold cut and fontina-topped pizza mimics the taste of the popular G-Man Italian sub at Capitol Hill’s Mangialardo. The eatery’s playful spirit is evident in everything from her pizzeria’s name (Boogy is a tribute to her beloved dog), a 30-seat dining room with bright blue tones and neon signage and squiggles, and the names of the pizzas (one of the pies is her friend’s Instagram handle).

1 Dupont Cir NW
Washington, DC 20036

6. Dovetail

1430 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, DC 20005
Roseda Farm dry-aged strip steak with braised veal cheek, potato fondue, charred leeks, and spring herbs salad at Dovetail.
Scott Suchman/Dovetail

An indoor-outdoor destination for artfully plated dishes from a tenured chef debuted in May on the first floor of the the posh, 178-room Viceroy Washington D.C., bringing Logan Circle a chic new spot to try trout roe-topped hushpuppies, bright spring asparagus soup poured tableside, grilled Spanish octopus, and plump Roseda Farm burgers. Chef James Gee, who used to feed celebrities at Hamptons hotspot Cittanuova, has amassed an impressive local resume at the helm of Jaleo, China Chilcano, and most recently, I’m Eddie Cano. Dovetail, open for dinner to start, sends out local brews, color-soaked cocktails, and RdV wines from a glossy bar.

1430 Rhode Island Ave NW
Washington, DC 20005

7. Causa/Bar Amazonia

920 Blagden Alley NW, Washington, DC 20001
Scallops in a shell
Scallops at Causa.
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

There are two levels to explore at this much-anticipated Blagden Alley restaurant, both of which celebrates the best of Peruvian ingredients and cooking techniques. Downstairs, the minimalist Causa will send out a six-course menu showcasing the cuisine of Peru’s coastline and Andes mountains. It’s more of a party upstairs at the leafy Bar Amazonia, which opened first with meat skewers, ceviches, and street food snacks — and aromatic cocktails like a gin and tonic made with Peruvian cinchona bark and a huge collection of pisco.

920 Blagden Alley NW
Washington, DC 20001

8. SHŌTŌ Washington DC

1100 15th St NW, Washington, DC 20005
SHŌTŌ’s open kitchen.
Rey Lopez for Shōtō

Three years in the making, Midtown Center’s scene-y Japanese showpiece brings D.C. a symmetrically pleasing sushi counter, wide Japanese spirits selection, and robata grill that cooks an array of fish, meats, skewers, poultry, and produce. London-based restaurateur Arjun Waney’s collective of brands also includes Zuma, a high-end sushi and izakaya concept with 18 locations around the world. The group’s go-to designer, Noriyoshi Muramatsu of Tokyo-based Studio Glit, is behind a luxe look largely assembled and sourced in Japan.

1100 15th St NW
Washington, DC 20005

9. Stellina Pizzeria

508 K St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Stellina’s Amatriciana pie (tomato sauce, guanciale, red onions, mozzarella, pecorino romano). 
Rey Lopez/Stellina

Stellina Pizzeria, known for cacio e pepe pizza and fried snacks, just opened up a third location with retro diner roots on K Street. Stellina replicated D.C.’s old Waffle Shop and inserted original details like its serpentine bar to go along with a huge Marra Forni pizza oven and murals of Italian film stars. In honor of the diner’s history, the Mount Vernon outpost’s menu includes a waffle panini.

508 K St NW
Washington, DC 20001

10. Taqueria Al Lado II

809 12th St NE, Washington, DC 20002

The pint-sized box that housed D.C. fried fish institution Horace and Dickie’s for three decades flipped in May into a Mexican street food stand centered around tequila and top-notch tortillas. Chef Rolando Frias opened the original Taqueria Al Lado in Adams Morgan last spring and quickly drew attention for being one of the few spots in town that grinds its own masa on-site. At its sophomore location across town, patrons choose a taco, quesadilla, huarache, or salad and a protein from a list that includes al pastor, lengua, chicken tinga, vegan barbacoa, tempura-battered cod, and more. Taqueria Al Lado II is smaller than the first, with just eight seats inside plus a 12-seat patio out front.

809 12th St NE
Washington, DC 20002

11. Fog Point at Assembly

1700 N Moore St, Arlington, VA 22209

A bright, 50-seat raw bar tucked off the Rosslyn Metro station brings a taste of the Atlantic coast to the center of Arlington’s skyscraper-filled neighborhood. The full-service addition to Rosslyn’s Assembly food hall, which sports its own entrance off Fort Myer Drive, opened in March with three types of shucked-to-order East Coast oysters to start. The glossy, nautical-themed setup also serves Maryland crab soup; salmon “flights” of the fish prepared three ways; and non-seafood options like chicken paella. Cocktails include a Grey Goose martini, negroni, French 75, and spins on classics like a mint julep engineered with reposado and yellow chartreuse. For dessert, homemade pies include key lime, caramel apple, and chocolate banana.

1700 N Moore St
Arlington, VA 22209

12. Rania

427 11th St NW, Washington, DC 20004
Rania’s namesake cocktail comes with Jin Jiji Gin, Zirbenz, pine liqueur, lime, and tea cordial.
Greg Powers for Rania

The palace-like Penn Quarter space that formerly housed Punjab Grill reopened this week as a luxe new Indian restaurant called Rania, which means “Queen” in Hindi and Sanskrit. Chef Chetan Shetty, who recently cooked at acclaimed New Delhi restaurant Indian Accent, guides diners through a multi-course dinner of inventive Indian cuisine that goes way beyond the expected (as in dishes like braised lamb shank accented with spinach, coconut foam, ghoda masala spice blend, and mustard frills). The 4,700-square-foot showpiece from international restaurateur Karan Singh drew lots of attention when it opened in 2019. Unlike Punjab Grill, Rania will focus on prix-fixe menu of either three courses ($75) or four courses ($90). An a la carte menu will be available at the restaurant’s Sundowner Bar.

427 11th St NW
Washington, DC 20004

13. Harvey's

513 W Broad St, Falls Church, VA 22046
Deviled eggs on a plate
Deviled eggs topped with pimento cheese, candied bacon, and chicharróns.
Butcher Photography/Harvey’s

The all-day American eatery and market with a knack for local produce, meats, wine, and beer comes from first-time restaurant owner and Virginia native Thomas Harvey, an alum of PartisanRed Apron Butcher, and Tuskie’s Restaurant Group in Virginia. Downtown Falls Church guests can kick off the day with La Colombe coffee and egg sandwiches, followed by fried calamari, fire-roasted onion dip, Bavarian pretzels with beer cheese, burgers, and pastrami sandwiches. Homey mains include spaghetti carbonara, porter-braised Seven Hills beef short ribs, a chicken Cobb salad, and steak frites, all served on decorative vintage plates.

513 W Broad St
Falls Church, VA 22046

14. Santa Rosa Taqueria

301 Pennsylvania Ave. SE, Washington, DC 20003
Fried shrimp tacos Santa Rosa Taqueria

Roasted harissa cauliflower tacos and al pastor tacos made with meat from a gyro wrapped around a pineapple make the menu at the re-opened Santa Rosa Taqueria. It’s in a new Capitol Hill location right next to the original, which shut down with the pandemic. Santa Rosa 2.0 includes a lengthy margarita list from mixologist Gina Chersevani of Buffalo & Bergen and a colorful Day of the Dead-themed mural in the dining room.

301 Pennsylvania Ave. SE
Washington, DC 20003

15. Newland

327 7th St SE unit A, Washington, DC 20003
Caviar service in a box
Luxe caviar add-ons arrive in retro lunch boxes at Newland.
Kimberly Kong for Newland

Beuchert’s Saloon chef Andrew Markert takes more of a refined approach at his chic, modern American restaurant on Capitol Hill, where tasting menus start at $80. A parade of plates embrace Mid-Atlantic ingredients and Markert’s cuisine-hopping resume at places like Michel Richard’s Citronelle and Gracie’s in Providence, Rhode Island. Newland, named after the Baltimore road where Markert lived as a kid, sends out charred scallops with crab fat powder, crispy pata with kumquat ragu and peppercorn jus, and dry-aged koji strip steak with beet bordelaise. Beuchert’s longtime beverage director Mackenzie Conway plays up lesser-known cocktails and spirits behind a sleek, five-seat bar.

327 7th St SE unit A
Washington, DC 20003

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