clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A close-up of a chimi de pierna, a Dominican sandwich on a torta stuffed with pulled pork, cabbage, carrots, and pink salsa.
The chimi de pierna at Mechos Dominican Kitchen.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

15 Sandwiches to Try Around D.C. Right Now

Where to grab one of these handheld masterpieces

View as Map
The chimi de pierna at Mechos Dominican Kitchen.
| Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

D.C. has no shortage of great grab-and-go meals. But there are certain sandwiches, hoagies, and grinders that every Washingtonian should seek out almost as a civic duty. Some can transport diners to far-off destinations like Italy, Mexico, or Vietnam. Others are so historic, they’re edible nostalgia.

Many of these essential sandwiches are found in 9-to-5 lunch zones, but others serve residential neighborhoods with fewer dining options, creating a cast of loyal regulars. Some are even worth a short drive. And some popular sandwich pop-ups born during the pandemic, like Fight Club and Your Only Friend, plan to open permanent D.C. locations this year.

—Updated by Eater staff

Don’t see a personal favorite on the list? Sound off in the comments or shoot us an email (dc@eater.com).

Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission.

Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

The Girl and The Vine

Copy Link

Takoma Park’s adorable cafe and wine shop counts the “Chip-wich” hoagie as one of its most popular orders since day one. The sandwich hides house kettle chips inside for a surprise crunch in every bite, joined by smoked turkey, smashed avocado, pepper jack cheese, bacon, sprouts, and dijonnaise.

Wagshal's (Multiple Locations)

Copy Link

This delicatessen, with two local locations, is a standard-bearer for pastrami, not to mention beef brisket. Those without a lot of restraint can give multiple meats a sample with the Superior, which stacks roast beef, corned beef, ham, pastrami, Russian dressing, slow, cheddar spread, and chopped liver.

Wagshal’s display case, with several meats showing behind glass
The display case at Wagshal’s
Wagshal’s [official photo]

Mechos Dominican Kitchen

Copy Link

Since its fall 2019 debut, Mechos has been in the business of introducing boardwalk-style chimichurri sandwiches to D.C. There are four types available: try the chimi de pierna, which is stuffed with pulled pork, cabbage, carrots, and pink salsa, and served on a torta.

A close-up of a chimi de pierna, a Dominican sandwich on a torta stuffed with pulled pork, cabbage, carrots, and pink salsa.
The chimi de pierna at Mechos.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Lulu’s Wine Garden

Copy Link

The Southwestern-style replacement to Vinoteca serves a solid smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich on Texas Toast, piled high with fermented red cabbage, pickles, crispy shallots, and an aioli made from pork drippings.

A smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich at Lulu’s Winegarden comes on Texas Toast with fermented red cabbage, pickles, lots of crispy shallots, and an aioli made from pork drippings
A smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich at Lulu’s Winegarden.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Capo Italian Deli (multiple locations)

Copy Link

The home of the original Fauci Pouchy is also famous for its Italian combo subs absolutely stuffed with sliced meats. Its new Western Market food hall stall will soon be joined by a Northern Virginia location in Tysons Corner.

Colada Shop

Copy Link

A good Cuban sandwich can be surprisingly tough to find in the greater D.C. region, but Colada Shop has an excellent version. Theirs leans traditional, with ham, roasted pork, Swiss cheese, mustard, pickles and cilantro aioli, on Cuban-style bread, of course.

A Cuban sandwich, cut in half and being stretched apart
The Cuban sandwich at Colada Shop
Maya Oren [official photo]

Nim Ali Shukos & Antojitos

Copy Link

Shaw’s Guatemalan street food pop-up, operating out of Jake’s Tavern since fall 2019, is best known for its shukos served on big, toasted buns. The “Chingo” is a foot-long monster stuffed with a whopping six types of meat: beef frank, Mexican chorizo, fajita asada, al pastor, bacon, and ham. Founders Rosario Guzman and Karla Alonzo, a married couple who hail from Puebla, Mexico, and San Lorenzo, Guatemala, respectively, will soon open a stall in Western Market.

Guatemalan-style shukos from Nim Ali get doused in condiments
Guatemalan-style shukos from Nim Ali get doused in condiments.
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

Jetties

Copy Link

There’s a special appeal when it comes to Thanksgiving sandwiches that can be found year-round. The Nobadeer at Jettie’s puts roasted turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce, and mayo on sourdough bread, and there’s no need to make the turkey dinner the day before in order to sample it.

Stachowski's Market

Copy Link

Around since 2011, Georgetown’s beloved butcher has a devoted neighborhood following for its hot pastrami, roast beef on rye, and meatball grinders. Its half-smokes and bratwurst are now featured on the menu at at Solace Brewing’s new Navy Yard tap room.

A. Litteri, Inc.

Copy Link

This Italian market near Union Market has been a low-key destination for Italian hoagies for many years. The classic features a mixture of capicola, Genoa salami, mortadella, Prosciutto, provolone cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, hot peppers, and Italian seasoning.

El Sol Restaurante & Tequileria

Copy Link

A pambazo torta stuffed with mashed potatoes and chorizo is a top seller at Shaw’s El Sol. Its chef Alfredo Solis used to make the dish for dinner as a teenager in Mexico. 

El Sol pambazo
A pambazo torta from El Sol
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Bub and Pop's

Copy Link

Family-owned Bub and Pop’s has the answer to just about any imaginable sandwich craving — whether that’s chicken and eggplant Parmesan, a classic Italian cold cut hoagie, or Pop’s beefy brisket sandwich. Sandwiches are available in half or hefty, whole portions.

Po Boy Jim Bar and Grill

Copy Link

The family-owned icon on H Street NE offers an extensive selection of its eponymous sandwiches, all served with a side of Cajun fries. Shrimp po’boys here come three ways (barbecue, grilled, or battered), but pulled pork, lobster, steak and cheese varieties are also fan favorites.

Grazie Grazie

Copy Link

Taylor Gourmet founder Casey Patten launched a second act with this Philadelphia-style sandwich shop in 2019. The tiny store is best known for its cheesesteaks built with grass-fed beef and Cooper sharp provolone.

A Philly Special cheesesteak from Grazie Grazie shows off layers of grass-fed beef, Cooper sharp provolone, lettuce, red onion, and tomato on a golden roll
A Philly Special cheesesteak from Grazie Grazie
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Banh Mi DC Sandwich

Copy Link

Excellent crispy bread and affordable prices help distinguish this banh mi purveyor from the pack (though D.C. has no shortage of excellent versions of the traditional Vietnamese sandwich). Go with the #1 (Banh Mi Dac Biet), a combination of various meat fillings, including Vietnamese cold cuts and pate.

A station of cold cuts and condiments with a worker slathering on dressing
The sandwich station at Banh Mi DC Sandwich
Photo: Bahn Mi DC Sandwich

The Girl and The Vine

Takoma Park’s adorable cafe and wine shop counts the “Chip-wich” hoagie as one of its most popular orders since day one. The sandwich hides house kettle chips inside for a surprise crunch in every bite, joined by smoked turkey, smashed avocado, pepper jack cheese, bacon, sprouts, and dijonnaise.

Wagshal's (Multiple Locations)

Wagshal’s display case, with several meats showing behind glass
The display case at Wagshal’s
Wagshal’s [official photo]

This delicatessen, with two local locations, is a standard-bearer for pastrami, not to mention beef brisket. Those without a lot of restraint can give multiple meats a sample with the Superior, which stacks roast beef, corned beef, ham, pastrami, Russian dressing, slow, cheddar spread, and chopped liver.

Wagshal’s display case, with several meats showing behind glass
The display case at Wagshal’s
Wagshal’s [official photo]

Mechos Dominican Kitchen

A close-up of a chimi de pierna, a Dominican sandwich on a torta stuffed with pulled pork, cabbage, carrots, and pink salsa.
The chimi de pierna at Mechos.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Since its fall 2019 debut, Mechos has been in the business of introducing boardwalk-style chimichurri sandwiches to D.C. There are four types available: try the chimi de pierna, which is stuffed with pulled pork, cabbage, carrots, and pink salsa, and served on a torta.

A close-up of a chimi de pierna, a Dominican sandwich on a torta stuffed with pulled pork, cabbage, carrots, and pink salsa.
The chimi de pierna at Mechos.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Lulu’s Wine Garden

A smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich at Lulu’s Winegarden comes on Texas Toast with fermented red cabbage, pickles, lots of crispy shallots, and an aioli made from pork drippings
A smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich at Lulu’s Winegarden.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

The Southwestern-style replacement to Vinoteca serves a solid smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich on Texas Toast, piled high with fermented red cabbage, pickles, crispy shallots, and an aioli made from pork drippings.

A smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich at Lulu’s Winegarden comes on Texas Toast with fermented red cabbage, pickles, lots of crispy shallots, and an aioli made from pork drippings
A smoked pork belly pastrami sandwich at Lulu’s Winegarden.
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Capo Italian Deli (multiple locations)

The home of the original Fauci Pouchy is also famous for its Italian combo subs absolutely stuffed with sliced meats. Its new Western Market food hall stall will soon be joined by a Northern Virginia location in Tysons Corner.

Colada Shop

A Cuban sandwich, cut in half and being stretched apart
The Cuban sandwich at Colada Shop
Maya Oren [official photo]

A good Cuban sandwich can be surprisingly tough to find in the greater D.C. region, but Colada Shop has an excellent version. Theirs leans traditional, with ham, roasted pork, Swiss cheese, mustard, pickles and cilantro aioli, on Cuban-style bread, of course.

A Cuban sandwich, cut in half and being stretched apart
The Cuban sandwich at Colada Shop
Maya Oren [official photo]

Nim Ali Shukos & Antojitos

Guatemalan-style shukos from Nim Ali get doused in condiments
Guatemalan-style shukos from Nim Ali get doused in condiments.
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

Shaw’s Guatemalan street food pop-up, operating out of Jake’s Tavern since fall 2019, is best known for its shukos served on big, toasted buns. The “Chingo” is a foot-long monster stuffed with a whopping six types of meat: beef frank, Mexican chorizo, fajita asada, al pastor, bacon, and ham. Founders Rosario Guzman and Karla Alonzo, a married couple who hail from Puebla, Mexico, and San Lorenzo, Guatemala, respectively, will soon open a stall in Western Market.

Guatemalan-style shukos from Nim Ali get doused in condiments
Guatemalan-style shukos from Nim Ali get doused in condiments.
Rey Lopez/Eater DC

Jetties

There’s a special appeal when it comes to Thanksgiving sandwiches that can be found year-round. The Nobadeer at Jettie’s puts roasted turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce, and mayo on sourdough bread, and there’s no need to make the turkey dinner the day before in order to sample it.

Stachowski's Market

Around since 2011, Georgetown’s beloved butcher has a devoted neighborhood following for its hot pastrami, roast beef on rye, and meatball grinders. Its half-smokes and bratwurst are now featured on the menu at at Solace Brewing’s new Navy Yard tap room.

A. Litteri, Inc.

This Italian market near Union Market has been a low-key destination for Italian hoagies for many years. The classic features a mixture of capicola, Genoa salami, mortadella, Prosciutto, provolone cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, hot peppers, and Italian seasoning.

El Sol Restaurante & Tequileria

El Sol pambazo
A pambazo torta from El Sol
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

A pambazo torta stuffed with mashed potatoes and chorizo is a top seller at Shaw’s El Sol. Its chef Alfredo Solis used to make the dish for dinner as a teenager in Mexico. 

El Sol pambazo
A pambazo torta from El Sol
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Bub and Pop's

Family-owned Bub and Pop’s has the answer to just about any imaginable sandwich craving — whether that’s chicken and eggplant Parmesan, a classic Italian cold cut hoagie, or Pop’s beefy brisket sandwich. Sandwiches are available in half or hefty, whole portions.

Po Boy Jim Bar and Grill

The family-owned icon on H Street NE offers an extensive selection of its eponymous sandwiches, all served with a side of Cajun fries. Shrimp po’boys here come three ways (barbecue, grilled, or battered), but pulled pork, lobster, steak and cheese varieties are also fan favorites.

Grazie Grazie

A Philly Special cheesesteak from Grazie Grazie shows off layers of grass-fed beef, Cooper sharp provolone, lettuce, red onion, and tomato on a golden roll
A Philly Special cheesesteak from Grazie Grazie
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Taylor Gourmet founder Casey Patten launched a second act with this Philadelphia-style sandwich shop in 2019. The tiny store is best known for its cheesesteaks built with grass-fed beef and Cooper sharp provolone.

A Philly Special cheesesteak from Grazie Grazie shows off layers of grass-fed beef, Cooper sharp provolone, lettuce, red onion, and tomato on a golden roll
A Philly Special cheesesteak from Grazie Grazie
Rey Lopez/Eater D.C.

Banh Mi DC Sandwich

A station of cold cuts and condiments with a worker slathering on dressing
The sandwich station at Banh Mi DC Sandwich
Photo: Bahn Mi DC Sandwich

Excellent crispy bread and affordable prices help distinguish this banh mi purveyor from the pack (though D.C. has no shortage of excellent versions of the traditional Vietnamese sandwich). Go with the #1 (Banh Mi Dac Biet), a combination of various meat fillings, including Vietnamese cold cuts and pate.

A station of cold cuts and condiments with a worker slathering on dressing
The sandwich station at Banh Mi DC Sandwich
Photo: Bahn Mi DC Sandwich

Related Maps