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Every D.C. Restaurant Marcus Samuelsson Visits on ‘No Passport Required’

Where to find injera, wat, and kitfo in the capital city

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In the sixth episode of “No Passport Required,” chef and host Marcus Samuelsson heads to DC to meet the city’s Ethiopian community. Because Samuelsson himself was born in Ethiopia, the food traditions and culture in the season finale allows him to explore his own relationship with his heritage.

In Ethiopia, the act of feeding others is the ultimate expression of love, and DC’s Ethiopian-American community embraces this notion full force. Here are the restaurants featured in this episode, listed in order of appearance. Watch the full episode here.

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Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

1. #1 ADARASH MARKET & CARRY OUT

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8706 Flower Ave
Silver Spring, MD 20901
(240) 863-3057
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Co-owner Ngussu Gudu takes pride in traditional Ethiopian spice blends his market offers, from berbere to mitmita. His wife and their son, Asefu Aragie and Samuel Nugussu, prepare Ethiopian-style coffee, called buna, while discussing their refugee story.

Injera.

2. Sidamo Coffee & Tea

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417 H St NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 548-0081
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Kenfe Bellay is the co-owner of Sidamo Coffee and Tea and speaks to what makes the Ethiopian coffee ceremony special. The beans are roasted, ground, and boiled to maximize their flavor, and the preparation and drinking of the coffee is treated with respect through the coffee ceremony, which is seen as a social occasion to bring people together through drink and conversation.

3. Abol Ethiopian Cuisine

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8626 Colesville Rd
Silver Spring, MD 20910
(301) 650-0061
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Ethiopian artist and entrepreneur Maki Siraj takes Samuelsson to Abol Ethiopian Cuisine. While eating injera, an Ethiopian flatbread, with a variety of vegetarian dishes, Siraj explains the concept of gursha, which means feeding as an act of friendship or love.

Combination meal on injera.

4. Beteseb Restaurant

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8201 Georgia Ave
Silver Spring, MD 20910
(301) 448-1625
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Darmyalesh Alemu is the chef and co-owner of Beteseb, a highly acclaimed restaurant in the D.C. area — and in Ethiopia. She teaches Samuelsson and Maya Haile how to make the perfect kitfo, raw minced beef marinated with spices, and niter kibbeh, a spiced, clarified butter.

Kitfo.

5. Asmara Restaurant

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2218 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009
(202) 588-8181
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Filmmaker and activist Mignotae Kebede brings Samuelsson to Asmara Restaurant. Over pasta saltata and kitta fit-fit, Kebede discusses her Eritrean-Ethiopean identity, and how the tension between those two communities inspires her to create more unifying art. Afterwards, Asmara chef Monsur Maruf shows Samuelsson how to make a traditional Eritrean breakfast.

6. Dama Pastry & Cafe

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1505 Columbia Pike
Arlington, VA 22204
(703) 920-5620
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Owner Amsale Saife-Selassie describes Dama Cafe Pod as a social hub for the entire Ethiopian-American community. Samuelsson dines with Hailu Mergia, Ethiopian musician, who explains how a touring opportunity in the United States eventually turned into a permanent move.

7. Das Ethiopian Cuisine

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1201 28th St NW
Washington, DC 20007
(202) 333-4710
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Silesh Aliform owns Das, an upscale Ethiopian restaurant in Georgetown. Over dishes like Ethiopian potato salad, he and his wife, Elizabeth Wossen, talk about the amount of hard work and perseverance required to build a successful immigrant business.

1. #1 ADARASH MARKET & CARRY OUT

8706 Flower Ave, Silver Spring, MD 20901
Injera.

Co-owner Ngussu Gudu takes pride in traditional Ethiopian spice blends his market offers, from berbere to mitmita. His wife and their son, Asefu Aragie and Samuel Nugussu, prepare Ethiopian-style coffee, called buna, while discussing their refugee story.

8706 Flower Ave
Silver Spring, MD 20901

2. Sidamo Coffee & Tea

417 H St NE, Washington, DC 20002

Kenfe Bellay is the co-owner of Sidamo Coffee and Tea and speaks to what makes the Ethiopian coffee ceremony special. The beans are roasted, ground, and boiled to maximize their flavor, and the preparation and drinking of the coffee is treated with respect through the coffee ceremony, which is seen as a social occasion to bring people together through drink and conversation.

417 H St NE
Washington, DC 20002

3. Abol Ethiopian Cuisine

8626 Colesville Rd, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Combination meal on injera.

Ethiopian artist and entrepreneur Maki Siraj takes Samuelsson to Abol Ethiopian Cuisine. While eating injera, an Ethiopian flatbread, with a variety of vegetarian dishes, Siraj explains the concept of gursha, which means feeding as an act of friendship or love.

8626 Colesville Rd
Silver Spring, MD 20910

4. Beteseb Restaurant

8201 Georgia Ave, Silver Spring, MD 20910
Kitfo.

Darmyalesh Alemu is the chef and co-owner of Beteseb, a highly acclaimed restaurant in the D.C. area — and in Ethiopia. She teaches Samuelsson and Maya Haile how to make the perfect kitfo, raw minced beef marinated with spices, and niter kibbeh, a spiced, clarified butter.

8201 Georgia Ave
Silver Spring, MD 20910

5. Asmara Restaurant

2218 18th St NW, Washington, DC 20009

Filmmaker and activist Mignotae Kebede brings Samuelsson to Asmara Restaurant. Over pasta saltata and kitta fit-fit, Kebede discusses her Eritrean-Ethiopean identity, and how the tension between those two communities inspires her to create more unifying art. Afterwards, Asmara chef Monsur Maruf shows Samuelsson how to make a traditional Eritrean breakfast.

2218 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

6. Dama Pastry & Cafe

1505 Columbia Pike, Arlington, VA 22204

Owner Amsale Saife-Selassie describes Dama Cafe Pod as a social hub for the entire Ethiopian-American community. Samuelsson dines with Hailu Mergia, Ethiopian musician, who explains how a touring opportunity in the United States eventually turned into a permanent move.

1505 Columbia Pike
Arlington, VA 22204

7. Das Ethiopian Cuisine

1201 28th St NW, Washington, DC 20007

Silesh Aliform owns Das, an upscale Ethiopian restaurant in Georgetown. Over dishes like Ethiopian potato salad, he and his wife, Elizabeth Wossen, talk about the amount of hard work and perseverance required to build a successful immigrant business.

1201 28th St NW
Washington, DC 20007

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