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Where to Eat Brazilian Food Around D.C.

Local destinations for spot-on South American favorites like grilled meats, feijoada, coxinha, and more

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As the fifth largest nation in the world, it comes as no surprise that Brazil boasts diverse regional cuisines. Many dishes reflect the nation’s history and are influenced by Portuguese colonization, its indigenous people and immigrants from Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

Across the D.C. area, and particularly in Maryland, you’ll find Brazilian food from across its 26 states that show off these culinary influences — from popular Brazilian-Lebanese street food like kibe and esfiha to seafood-focused dishes of the northeastern states that are heavily influenced by African culture.

To get a wide-ranging taste of what the South American country has to offer, skip the big Brazilian chains like Fogo de Chao and consider a meal at these local restaurants, bars, cafes, and food trucks. Find its fruity-and-refreshing national cocktail, the caipirinha, around town here.

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Brazilian Bakery

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While many come to Brazilian Bakery for its pão fançes, or mini French baguettes eaten at breakfast or used for sandwiches, it offers a little bit of everything. Popular savory snacks like pão de queijo (tapioca cheese bread) and different pastéis — similar to empanadas — appear alongside sweets like the doce de leite rocambole cake slices and bolo de aipim (cassava cake). For those looking for something heartier, the menu also includes loaded Brazilian hot dogs and a modest yet traditional Brazilian buffet. Try the coxinhas (fried croquettes stuffed with shredded chicken), one of Brazil’s most well-known salgados, or small savory snacks.

Fire Pit Brazilian Barbecue Food Truck

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Located in Golden Arcade shopping center in Rockville, the food truck’s calling sign is the trail of smoke emanating from the charcoal grill. Hailing from Rio Grande de Sul, the southern state where Brazilian churrasco began, Gui Gonzalez serves a more casual, a la carte version of Brazilian barbecue out of his truck. Pick from four smoky meat options: pork ribs, short ribs, chicken and picanha. You can order them with sides like black beans and Brazilian farofa (toasted cassava flour with bacon and spices) or in an Italian sub bun with melted mozzarella, arugula and pit sauce. Meat can also be ordered by the pound. 

Brazilian Place

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Along with churrasco, Brazilian restaurants are known for their buffets. Leaning into the home cooking you’d find around a family table, Brazilian Place’s version offers a variety of classic stews and hearty sides — from traditional feijoada (black bean stew) to Brazilian stroganoff and fried bananas. While the buffet comes in an all-you-can-eat or by-weight format with an option for a churrasco combo, diners can also order a la carte items like street food and desserts. Order online

Brazilian Place’s best-selling bife à Milanesa (breaded pan-fried steak with rice, beans, and potato salad).
Brazilian Place

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Though its açai bowls are popular, you can expect an assortment of Brazilian snacks and desserts at this cozy cafe-supermarket hybrid. The counter is split by sweet and savory options — one side displaying ornate miniature confections like brigadeiros (chocolate truffles covered in sprinkles) and coconut-y quindim custard while the other side is stacked with handheld staples such as kibe (derived from Levantine kibbeh) and risoles (croquettes). Grab a mix of food and a Guaraná soda to round everything out.

Bossa Bistro & Lounge

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Known for hosting live music, Bossa’s name isn’t its only nod to Brazil. Since 2007, when Brazilian co-owner Wagner Depinho joined the team, the kitchen has paired a solid mix of Brazilian dishes with strong caipirinhas, the country’s national cocktail made from muddled limes, sugar and cachaça, a distilled spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice. With everything from bite-sized croquettes to feijão tropeiro (bean, sausage and cassava flour dish popular in Minas Gerais) on the menu, diners can try both small bites and more substantial plates.

The Grill From Ipanema

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Alcy de Souza’s restaurant, located in Adams Morgan since 1992, showcases an extensive menu that highlights dishes from many parts of Brazil. There are plenty of steaks and meats to choose from, such as picanha (sirloin cap) from southern Brazil and northeastern staple carne de sol (salty, sun-dried steak). Diners can find many seafood options, too, including two distinct types of moqueca (seafood stew) found in the neighboring Brazilian states of Espírito Santo and Bahia. There are also dishes with Portuguese influence like crispy bolo de bacalhau (salted cod fritters) alongside popular small bites like mandioca frita (fried yuca) and coxinha (fried croquettes stuffed with shredded chicken). Don’t pass up a caipirinha to balance the hearty meal.

Fried croquettes at the Grill From Ipanema.
The Grill From Ipanema

Charbroil Grill Brazilian Steakhouse

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Specializing in churrasco, the famous barbecue style of Brazil’s southern region, Charbroil serves a variety of meats that are roasted on a spit over an open flame. Cuts include popular Brazilian staples like linguiça (pork sausage), fraldinha (flank steak) and picanha (sirloin cap) — cooked and cut to order by servers who circulate around the dining room offering tables different skewers of meat. Known as a rodízio restaurant, Charbroil charges a flat rate for the meal, which gets you access to as many rounds of meat as you want, along with a salad bar.

Speared steaks at Charbroil Grill Brazilian Steakhouse.
Charbroil Grill Brazilian Steakhouse

Brazilian Bakery

While many come to Brazilian Bakery for its pão fançes, or mini French baguettes eaten at breakfast or used for sandwiches, it offers a little bit of everything. Popular savory snacks like pão de queijo (tapioca cheese bread) and different pastéis — similar to empanadas — appear alongside sweets like the doce de leite rocambole cake slices and bolo de aipim (cassava cake). For those looking for something heartier, the menu also includes loaded Brazilian hot dogs and a modest yet traditional Brazilian buffet. Try the coxinhas (fried croquettes stuffed with shredded chicken), one of Brazil’s most well-known salgados, or small savory snacks.

Fire Pit Brazilian Barbecue Food Truck

Located in Golden Arcade shopping center in Rockville, the food truck’s calling sign is the trail of smoke emanating from the charcoal grill. Hailing from Rio Grande de Sul, the southern state where Brazilian churrasco began, Gui Gonzalez serves a more casual, a la carte version of Brazilian barbecue out of his truck. Pick from four smoky meat options: pork ribs, short ribs, chicken and picanha. You can order them with sides like black beans and Brazilian farofa (toasted cassava flour with bacon and spices) or in an Italian sub bun with melted mozzarella, arugula and pit sauce. Meat can also be ordered by the pound. 

Brazilian Place

Along with churrasco, Brazilian restaurants are known for their buffets. Leaning into the home cooking you’d find around a family table, Brazilian Place’s version offers a variety of classic stews and hearty sides — from traditional feijoada (black bean stew) to Brazilian stroganoff and fried bananas. While the buffet comes in an all-you-can-eat or by-weight format with an option for a churrasco combo, diners can also order a la carte items like street food and desserts. Order online

Brazilian Place’s best-selling bife à Milanesa (breaded pan-fried steak with rice, beans, and potato salad).
Brazilian Place

By Brazil

Though its açai bowls are popular, you can expect an assortment of Brazilian snacks and desserts at this cozy cafe-supermarket hybrid. The counter is split by sweet and savory options — one side displaying ornate miniature confections like brigadeiros (chocolate truffles covered in sprinkles) and coconut-y quindim custard while the other side is stacked with handheld staples such as kibe (derived from Levantine kibbeh) and risoles (croquettes). Grab a mix of food and a Guaraná soda to round everything out.

Bossa Bistro & Lounge

Known for hosting live music, Bossa’s name isn’t its only nod to Brazil. Since 2007, when Brazilian co-owner Wagner Depinho joined the team, the kitchen has paired a solid mix of Brazilian dishes with strong caipirinhas, the country’s national cocktail made from muddled limes, sugar and cachaça, a distilled spirit made from fermented sugarcane juice. With everything from bite-sized croquettes to feijão tropeiro (bean, sausage and cassava flour dish popular in Minas Gerais) on the menu, diners can try both small bites and more substantial plates.

The Grill From Ipanema

Alcy de Souza’s restaurant, located in Adams Morgan since 1992, showcases an extensive menu that highlights dishes from many parts of Brazil. There are plenty of steaks and meats to choose from, such as picanha (sirloin cap) from southern Brazil and northeastern staple carne de sol (salty, sun-dried steak). Diners can find many seafood options, too, including two distinct types of moqueca (seafood stew) found in the neighboring Brazilian states of Espírito Santo and Bahia. There are also dishes with Portuguese influence like crispy bolo de bacalhau (salted cod fritters) alongside popular small bites like mandioca frita (fried yuca) and coxinha (fried croquettes stuffed with shredded chicken). Don’t pass up a caipirinha to balance the hearty meal.

Fried croquettes at the Grill From Ipanema.
The Grill From Ipanema

Charbroil Grill Brazilian Steakhouse

Specializing in churrasco, the famous barbecue style of Brazil’s southern region, Charbroil serves a variety of meats that are roasted on a spit over an open flame. Cuts include popular Brazilian staples like linguiça (pork sausage), fraldinha (flank steak) and picanha (sirloin cap) — cooked and cut to order by servers who circulate around the dining room offering tables different skewers of meat. Known as a rodízio restaurant, Charbroil charges a flat rate for the meal, which gets you access to as many rounds of meat as you want, along with a salad bar.

Speared steaks at Charbroil Grill Brazilian Steakhouse.
Charbroil Grill Brazilian Steakhouse

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